30
Nov

Year-End Business Planning Provides Tax Savings: Hire Now

Hire a worker who has been unemployed for at least 60 days before year end if you are thinking of adding to payroll soon. Your business will be exempt from paying the employer's 6.2% share of the Social Security payroll tax on the formerly unemployed new-hire for the remainder of 2010. Plus, if you keep that formerly unemployed new-hire on the payroll for a continuous 52 weeks, your business will be eligible for a nonrefundable tax credit of up-to-$1,000 after the 52-week threshold is reached. This credit will be taken on the business's 2011 tax return. In order to be eligible, the formerly unemployed new-hire's pay in the second 26-week period must be at least 80% of the pay in the first 26-week period. Contact our office for more information on how this tax savings could benefit your company.
26
Nov

Year-End Business Planning Provides Tax Savings: Business Property Expensing

To help reduce your tax liability, you can make expenses qualifying for the $500,000 business property expensing option. The maximum amount you can expense for a tax year beginning in 2010 is $500,000 of the cost of qualifying property placed in service for that tax year. The $500,000 amount is reduced by the amount by which the cost of qualifying property placed in service during 2010 exceeds $2 million. Also, within the overall $500,000 expensing limit, you can expense up to $250,000 of qualified real property (certain qualifying leasehold improvements, restaurant property, and retail improvements). Note that at tax return time, you can choose not to use expensing (or bonus depreciation) for 2010 assets. This is something to consider if tax rates go up for 2011 and future years, and you'd rather have more deductions after 2010 than for 2010. Our office can help you work through this decision-making process.
8
Nov

Tax Changes: Small Business Jobs Act of 2010

The Small Business Jobs Act of 2010 made beneficial changes to the application of general business credits toward tax and AMT liability offsets. (P.L. 111-240) General business credits of eligible small businesses for 2010 get five-year carryback. Generally, a business's unused general business credits can be carried back to offset taxes paid in the previous year, and the remaining amount can be carried forward for 20 years to offset future tax liabilities. Under Small Business Jobs Act, for the first tax year of the taxpayer beginning in 2010, eligible small businesses can carry back unused general business credits for five years instead of just one. Eligible small businesses are sole proprietorships, partnerships and non-publicly traded corporations with $50 million or less in average annual gross receipts for the prior three years. General business credits of eligible small businesses not subject to AMT for 2010. Under the AMT, taxpayers can generally only claim allowable general business credits against their regular tax liability, and only to the extent that their regular tax liability exceeds their AMT liability. A few credits, such as the credit for small business employee health insurance expenses, can be used to offset AMT liability. The Small Business Jobs Act allows eligible small businesses to use all types of general business credits to offset their AMT in tax years beginning in 2010. (Source for this information: © 2010 Thomson Reuters/RIA. All rights reserved.) If you are unsure of how your general business credits can be used to offset your tax or AMT liability, contact your CPA.
26
Oct

Why do I need a compiled financial statement?

Complied financial statements are a powerful tool for effective tax planning. Provided on a quarterly basis, these account recordings allow us to provide 1) precise income tax liability calculations, 2) accurate long-term tax planning, and 3) priority handling of your tax return. By placing your quarterly financial picture into our professional format, you will eliminate mad scrambles for end-of-year accounting information, and reduce the need to file an income tax extension. Also, compiling your financials after end-of-year does not allow us to influence your tax picture to ensure that you minimize your liabilities and eliminate surprises.